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Visual Aesthetics

Theory Behind the Story

A Response to Journalism in the Age of Data

Watching Journalism in the Age of Data reminded me of the universality of the skills my classmates and I are learning in our iMedia classes this ear. The documentary commented on data visualization, and its emerging importance in our world. IBM researcher Fernanda Viegas spoke to its relevance stating, “Half of our brain is hardwired for vision.” Human beings may analyze information better when seen visually, and effective data visualization has conscious intent behind why information is displayed in a particular way.

However, it’s all about the story.

Good aesthetics of data visualization is insignificant if information is lacking or not displayed properly. Also, good information can go unnoticed if it is not presented in an innovative way. In this documentary Martin Wattenberg says, “I think the best way for people to learn about visualizations is to make it.” This describes exactly what my iMedia classmates and I are doing. We’re diving right in and using tools we have no prior experience in. While figuring out the technicalities, it’s important to be cognizant of the intent behind our creations. What story are we going to tell? How is this best visually represented? The topics discussed in Journalism of Data are relevant in a variety of ways in the Interactive Media field, and this documentary raised good points worthy to remember when creating media.

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About lindseyhuston

I'm a strategic thinker with an eye for design. A recent graduate of Wofford College, my liberal arts background in Philosophy and English provided me with extensive writing and analytical skills. I’m adding to my skill set at Elon University learning as an MA in Interactive Media student. Teachable, driven, with an affinity towards networking, I hope to utilize my skills in a career in advertising and interactive design.

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